Category Archives: Persecution, Fear, Boldness

Where are you going?—A Story Of Modern Persecution

In a recent update, I mentioned about us having a dumpling activity. That Sunday, something else happened that I didn’t fully understand until the following week.

One of the older ladies in our church whom our children call “grandma” had a different Sunday morning than I did. She didn’t get saved at our church but visited not too long after she did and got clarity, assurance and baptized in our church (the government church she attended before was charismatic and bordered baptismal regeneration). She has been growing, and you can see the change in her life. Her friends and family have even mentioned the positive change.

Her husband is against her coming to church. But she has seen a change in the way that she respects him, and she has told him that change has come because she is a Christian now and she is following what the Bible says. It has been an active witness. But he is still against her coming to church.

She is a servant. She helps with the food every week, helps my wife plan activities, helps clean and helps watch the kids and do the nursery. She is a blessing to our church, and we consider her family.

Although her husband is against her coming to church, he will allow her to come if she says she is coming to help with children or something of that nature. But this past Sunday when we had the dumpling activity, she was leading it. She was leaving her house on Sunday morning with several of the things we would need for the activity. Her husband asked her, “Where are you going?” She told him she was heading to the church, and we were having a special activity that day. What happened next was hard to hear. Her husband was angry and from what I was told there was yelling and he ripped her cross necklace off, pushed her down or kicked her, and her leg somehow got a huge gash in it from the confrontation. However it ended, she showed up at church that morning with a smile on her face.

In fact, that whole Sunday I never would of know that something was wrong with her. She was abused by her husband for coming to church. But she didn’t complain or draw attention to herself. She served relentlessly that whole day. By that afternoon, we knew there was some argument that happened, but this wasn’t uncommon, so we told her she could come to our house for awhile (as we need someone to watch the kids while we went out).

She didn’t complain. She suffered with joy. She showed us how to glorify God in suffering.

I didn’t hear the whole story and see the gash in her leg until later, but when I found out and realized that she serve so graciously in spite of all that happened I was thankful for what Jesus had done in her life!

Confessions of a Missionary (1 of 3) Bold but Worth the Risk!

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I have talked a lot about being bold and fearful and even given some of my struggle with it. I imagine that many people think that I exaggerate when I talk about how fear can inhibit a believer from being all that they can be for Jesus while living in China. So today I want to share the testimony of a missionary who was indoctrinated to be fearful and yet always knew there was something that wasn’t right. He knew there had to be more. More freedom. He wanted to thrive, but everything around him said he couldn’t. After interactions with Project China, he realized that if God could use little nothings like us to be bold and carry forth the mission in China, then God could also use him. This is a story of freedom–freedom from the fear of missions spread by missionaries.

“God has been working in our lives giving us a passion for boldly preaching Christ. I need to start here to explain why our approach has changed so drastically in the last year or so. From when we first arrived until a little over a year ago my family and I lived in fear of being caught spreading the gospel. I lived in fear of deportation or getting Chinese Christians into trouble. We feared every phone call, every text message, and every post on all social media venues. Even at times, we found ourselves paranoid that the Chinese government bugged our home. Honestly, it felt cool for the first little while we were here but then it just became a burden. Every time I felt the desire to tell someone even a little bit about the hope we believe in I would wonder ” does this person work for the government”? or “should I get to know this guy much more before I give him an opportunity to know who GOD is.” Then I would walk away and never see him again. Then I would continue to ask myself… “If he were a government worker did he not deserve to hear the message too. Is he less important than anyone else.” In all this, I felt defeated and felt that I would never be able to make a huge impact in China. While reading about persecution in the Bible, I would find myself saying “yeah I’m willing to die for Christ or go to prison for the sake of the Gospel.” (Philippians 1:20) I would ask myself “why do I believe I am willing to die for the Gospel when I am not willing to be kicked out for the Gospel?” What’s more important me staying here or giving more people the opportunity to hear the good news for the first time. (Romans 10:14-15) I was wondering if all my fears I was feeding with more fears were real or just illusions. I had the desire to live fearlessly and be like the examples of the Bible, but the atmosphere of fear around me kept telling me to stay undercover. Paul went into cities, preached the gospel, and the people stoned him and left him for dead. Paul then stood up and went back in, risking it all with no immediate fruit to show for it. Yes, his effort resulted in many seeds sown for someone else to harvest but no immediate fruit. Sometimes we risk it all, get hammered, and lose it all, and the possibility of losing it all so that one person may believe seems worth the risk to me.

I heard about another missionary in our city that had been in China a year less than us. He was risking it all, living a gospel-driven life of boldness, and all in the heart language. I had to see it with my own eyes. After I saw his boldness I knew this man was crazy. After witnessing his boldness in person and his online posts, I knew he would be kicked out of China in no time, in fact according to the conventional wisdom they should have deported him long ago. I did not like him because his actions challenged everything I believed about being a missionary in China. I then learned that his teammate was kicked out of China the same month that I met him. His friend was a part of starting multiple churches in another city that are still thriving today without the help of missionaries. These churches are in the process of training pastors to continue the spreading of the Gospel. I could not believe that a family could have so much success in such a short time. He is now in Taiwan attempting to do the same thing even though his heart is in mainland China. The Chinese government told him he could come back in five years.

I was intrigued and needed to learn more. I always assumed that any openness at all would get you deported immediately. After knowing and meeting many Christians from the churches of the deported missionary family, it became obvious this is not true. This guy was here long enough to start four churches in his boldness in just a little more time than we have been here, and we had not started any. I could see that the risk was real but worth it. I slowly become committed to starting a church and after losing all fear and becoming fearlessly bold I discovered the freedom and peace of Christ. This freedom and peace I mention is truly like the peace that Philippians 4 talks about that is beyond human comprehension otherwise I would attempt to describe it to you.”

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Afraid?

I reading about the life of John and Betty Stam. In the book there is a part that recalls a poem written by a missionary after his colleague had been martyred. The poem, entitled, “Afraid?” puts into perspective the right mindset that we as Christians should have in the Lord’s service.

O’, if modern-day missionaries in China could grasp the heartbeat of this poem, then we would see God do even greater things in this land. Missionaries of old, who were under threat of actually loosing their lives, and many did lose their live, for the sake of the gospel were able to boldly go forward preaching the gospel. In modern-day China we are most likely only to lose our visa, be fined, or banned from entering for five years.

Modern missionary, read the biographies of the great men and women of faith who came to this land before us and read of their great faith. How far we have fallen. Restore us o’ God! To God be the glory.

The poem, entitled ‘Afraid?’ was written by Presbyterian missionary E. H. Hamilton following the recent martyrdom of one of his colleagues, J. W. Vinson, at the hands of rebel soldiers in northern China. A small Chinese girl who escaped from the bandits related the incident that provided the inspiration for Hamilton’s poem.

‘Are you afraid?’ the bandits asked Vinson as they menacingly waved a gun in front of him. ‘No,’ he replied with complete assurance. ‘If you shoot, I go straight to heaven.’ His decapitated body was found later.

Afraid? Of What?
To feel the spirit’s glad release?
To pass from pain to perfect peace,
The strife and strain of life to cease?
Afraid – of that?

Afraid? Of What?
Afraid to see the Savior’s face,
To hear His welcome, and to trace
The glory gleam from wounds of grace?
Afraid – of that?

Afraid? Of What?
A flash, a crash, a pierced heart;
Darkness, light, O Heaven’s art!
A wound of His a counterpart!
Afraid – of that?

Afraid? Of What?
To do by death what life could not –
Baptize with blood a stony plot,
Till souls shall blossom from the spot?
Afraid – of that? [1]

Hate Mail (Considering Common Questions)

Whenever you put out a strong opinion about something… you can expect hate mail.

You know, the messages you get on Facebook, email, and your blog that doesn’t make sense. The person discounts all the good that happened. The messages are written in one big continuous block of text full of bad spelling and grammar. The message is hard to understand and common sense it nowhere to be found. Okay, I could go on, but there is no need. You get the point.

I have pretty strong views and write from a perspective that expresses my opinion. Am I always right, definitely nope. When people disagree, they often let me know in a not so pleasant way. I guess this is what I deserve since I often react in a bad way to things I don’t agree with instead of acting in a proper way. I am trying to grow and learn.

I hope that many of my post don’t come across as judgmental. I hope they encourage the fearful to be brave. I hope they encourage the lazy to be active. I hope they encourage the foolish to be wise.

I know this doesn’t always happen because people take personal offense, or they defend why they do things the way they do. They simply react to what they disagree with or what makes them uncomfortable. (I am fine with people having different opinions and expressing them in an intelligent, normal, productive way.)

One thing I have learned from working around missionaries to closed countries is this: everyone lives on a different level of fear and most people are looking out for themselves; therefore, brotherly love is often dismissed because fear rule one’s emotions.

Fear is a greater problem than most people imagine. Fear is one of the major hindrances of the gospel in China. Fear can hinder the best of us. Fear can cause you to doubt everything you have been taught to do. Fear makes you act crazy and respond in unusually ways. Fear is worse than culture shock because it is something you can never get comfortable with in your life. Fear causes you to think crazy things. Fear messes with your thought life and causes you to think things are happening that aren’t.

Fear is often what causes people to send hate mail.

(Side note: I have learned something else: missionaries who work together as a team that encourages and helps each other seem to do better at overcoming fear.)

Whenever something drastic happens… you can expect hate mail.

Our team had two men deported from China. We knew hate mail would come. Why? Because of our strong stance before our men were ever kicked out. Every since I have been a missionary to China, there have been haters prophesying my downfall and those I work with. I have written about all the “alarms” and discouragement from different people over the years. (A simple search on this blog and you will be able to find it.)

People have been telling us for years that we are going to be kicked out of China. Some would say it to our faces and others would just say it to others. So, why didn’t we listen to these warnings? Why didn’t we listen to the caution and the perceived wisdom of others?

This is a good question to ask and answer. I wanted to answer it for those who may be wondering. I know haters will be haters, and this won’t change them. So let me try to explain for everyone else who is genuinely wondering…

Answer: We do ministry in the manner that we do because we believe it is right and the best way to accomplish our goals.

There are two aspects to what I mean here:

(1) The Fundamentals (non-negotiable) – These are the core things that we are committed to doing where ever we are doing ministry in the world, such as, preaching the gospel, making disciples, planting churches, training men, etc. If I was not able to do these things in a consistent manner, then I would change fields or be persecuted for doing them. To me, these “fundamentals” are to be obeyed or disobeyed.

Many people working in China often give up the rights to some of the fundamentals so they can do the other or vice versa (usually give up everything else for the opportunity to do some evangelism). But most people would agree that we need to obey these, and they usually don’t send hate mail to us because we shared the gospel with someone (though you might be suprised).

The hate mail usually comes from the second aspect:

(2) The Preferences (negotiable) – These are all the “hot button” issues. How open should we preach the gospel? How much information do we put on the internet? Do we have to talk in code? Can you send a text message to someone with “Bible words” in it? Can you invite strangers to your church or do they first have to have a relationship with someone, so you know they aren’t undercover police? Can you use Facebook? Should you use a false name? Should you witness to a police officer?

As a team, we have taken an “open” stance in both of these areas. For us, the “fundamentals” are settled. It is the “preferences” that are constantly changing. We do have limits. I don’t think anyone on our team has been preaching on the street with a bullhorn. We don’t think there is anything wrong with it; we just have chosen not to do it because we don’t think it helps us accomplish our goal. Opportunities for us to present the gospel in a more clear and effective way are abundant. So we have chosen a different route.

Other areas, such as our openness on the internet and lack of code words often get us hate mail. So why do we not listen to these objections from others? Because we don’t think that it hurts our ministry in China. We don’t believe what most people say about this aspect of ministry in China is true. We have found no links between any of the cases that we have studied. Maybe we aren’t studying the right people, and we are ignorant on the subject (most haters would agree we are). Here is a part of a comment I left in response to someone on my blog in 2011:

“I will never deny the technology is possible because enough research will scare anyone to not post anything on the internet. I think missionaries are low on the government’s radar, and they aren’t investing money into hunting down missionaries online.”

“I could be wrong but from looking at the facts and actual situations leaving the “fear” aspect of it aside, I see no great danger at this present time. Every worker in China must make their own decisions about their “online presence”. One day it might be a serious problem, but I have found that when you worry about the smallest of things, you usually let that affect the larger more important things.”

Another question you might have is: How is this the best way to accomplish your goals if you get deported?

Answer: We believe that we can produce more fruit doing ministry with a wise forwardness (boldness) in a short period than doing ministry with a fearful mindset over a long period.

The above answer may be offensive to some. Sorry.

As I mentioned above, the “fundamentals” are settled. The “preferences” will change when we see a problem arise. If we are doing something that doesn’t have to be done (non-fundamental) and it causes us problems, then we will change it up. We don’t desire to cling to “it has to be done this way” traditions.

In conclusion, if you see our team doing something that you are wondering about, it is probably for one of the five reasons:

  1. We don’t think it is a threat.
  2. It is a threat but a fundamental.
  3. It is a threat, not a fundamental, but the effectiveness is worth the risk.
  4. It is not a fundamental, but we don’t know if it is a threat or not, so we are testing the line and willing to take the risk.
  5. It is not a fundamental, but it is a threat and we are not wanting to take the risk.

Below are a five examples of how the above reasons are practically applied:

  1. The internet, we don’t think it is a threat.
  2. Church services are a threat but a fundamental.
  3. Introducing myself as a pastor to strangers is a threat, not a fundamental, but the effectiveness is worth the risk.
  4. A church sign is not a fundamental, but we don’t know if it is a threat or not, so we are testing the line and willing to take the risk.
  5. Street preaching with a bullhorn is not a fundamental, but it is a threat and we are not wanting to take the risk.

What is Persecution?

I have studied persecution for a long time now. Through my studies, I have learned a lot about the subject and am still learning more and more. The subject became even more interesting to me when we decided to come to China as missionaries.

I have prepared material for and taught a course called the “Theology of Persecution”. In this course, I attempted to form the doctrine of persecution from Genesis to Revelation. My hope was to show that servants of God through the ages have endured some form of persecution, and it still is happening today. (I have wanted to turn this into a blog series, but this post will do for the time being.)

The following is from the introduction of the course, but it will help us better understand what persecution is.

In this study we define persecution in the following way:

Persecution is hostility, harm, harassment, death or any other ill-treatment towards Christians because of their obedience to the will of God, even more so, to His will as revealed in Scripture.

Though this definition may seem broad, below are some points to narrow our position: We are not referring to human rights. We are not referring to principles or grey areas. We are referring to the clear and unchanging mandates of the will of God. We will be focusing on current mandates given to the New Testament Church. We are not referring to suffering in a general sense.

Also, as we considered those persecuted for righteousness sake, we noted there are three areas or reasons why people suffered persecution:

Association – Because they identify with God or the people of God.
Proclamation – Because of the message they preach or proclaim.
Submission – Because they are obedient to and do the will of God.

So with this as a basis for understanding persecution, the next question to ask is “Is what is happening now considered persecution?” I undoubtedly say, “yes.” As I had written before: “Church services were stopped. Christians were detained and questioned. Some were threatened to be kicked out of the country. Items were confiscated by the police (computers, money, song books, etc.). Houses were searched though, and privacy was invaded.”

Why did this happen? Why are our friends being threatened to be expelled from the country? As I noted in an earlier post: “The reason for the persecution is simple: believers were actively, consistently, and boldly teaching the Bible and establishing local independent churches.” If the Chinese nationals or the American missionaries would stop doing this, then they would not have a problem with the government which does not allow this to take place.

Let me be clear, there has not been any violent persecution. There has been no beatings, stoning, or jail time. The police and those that have been involved have not had to use force because the Christians have been “harmless as doves” during the process. But that does not mean things can not escalate in the future. If often happens like that in the Bible.

Persecution also isn’t just measured in degrees of physical pain. I do think there are degrees of persecution, some obviously worse than others (the greatest being martyrdom), but that does not diminish the less painful forms.

It is hard to fully understand the context of what is happening here unless you are living in it.

Yes, the Americans will be sent back to the comforts of America (if they get deported) so it does not seem like persecution. But when your entire family is forced to uproot themselves and leave the place they have labored in for so long simply because they were serving Jesus, that is considered to be persecution in my book. Their hearts will be broken for the people they desire so much to give the gospel to and yet blessed because they were worthy to suffer in a small way for the sake of the gospel.

The Chinese will stay. They have been warned in the past with multiple offenses. They will continue leading the churches despite the illegal status of the churches. Maybe the government will allow the churches to register (they haven’t in the past) or maybe they will continue to cause them trouble. The Chinese believers will need your continued prayers.

Finally, let me end with this Bible example of persecution that is relevant to this situation:

ACTS 13:14-52

Who was Persecuted?
Paul and Barnabas (Acts 13:46)

Type(s) of Persecution? (how)
They spoke against the things spoken by Paul, contradicting and blaspheming them (Acts 13:45), raised persecution and expelled them from their coast (Acts 13:50)

Reason(s) for Persecution? (why)
He preached Jesus to them in the Synagogue. (Acts 13:16-41)

Response(s) and Result(s) to the Persecution?
They first turned to the gentiles and preached to them (Acts 13:46-48) and then they shook the dust off their feet against them and went to Iconium (Acts 13:51). The disciples were filled with joy and the Holy Ghost (Acts 13:52)

What next? How do we go forward?

Through the interrogations at the police station, they know just about everything about the Harbin ministry. They know how much money is spent, where the churches’ location are, who the leaders are, the names of everyone that was in attendance, etc. So the obvious question is, “What next?

Many people are probably wondering “how do they move forward” after an event like this happens.

If our American missionary friends get kicked out, how can we in good conscience tell others to go? How can we encourage people to continue to be bold in China? Were we out-of-place in our thinking and bold approach to ministry in a closed country? We talked much, and now we are in trouble. What now?

To me, the answer to these question are simple: we will keep doing what we have always done because it is biblical. Nothing changes. We do not advocate being bold because we think you won’t get caught, but because it is the Bible thing to do.

There are mixed emotions that come with an event like this, but I do know that it encourages me (to train men and continue attempting great things for God). You can be confident that…

We will not back down.

We will not be silent.

We will be loud.

We will be bold.

The churches in Harbin were ultimately caught because they were bold in ministry and the people who don’t approve of Christian activities found out and persecuted them for it.

The reason for the persecution is simple: believers were actively, consistently, and boldly teaching the Bible and establishing local independent churches. If they would stop doing that and just become timid evangelist, there would be no persecution (proof is in the evidence of the thousands living in China just occasionally “sharing” the gospel when opportunities arise).

So, how do they/we/you go forward?

For the churches, they should continue doing what they always have done. Yes, they may evaluate some of the areas they have used for outreach and change the methods, but they must continue getting the gospel out and teaching the Word of God. They must continue meeting together, partaking in the Lord’s supper, baptizing new converts, supporting their pastor, etc. lest they cease to be a local church.

For perspective missionaries, come with us to China and risk being deported for the gospel. When the police came the first time in 2011, I was the only one on our team that was in attendance. They questioned me on the spot and warned me about all the laws of China. At that time, there was one main church in Harbin and no churches in Dalian. Now, there are four churches in Harbin (with men training to start more), and there are two new churches in Dalian. Look how much was accomplished within a short-time! Let us help train you to do just this, start churches and train men!

For us, China is risky, and we will risk it. Afterall, we are missionaries, it’s an occupational hazard. This is not the first time of persecution for our team. You can read back through the post on this blog and see that we have experienced this as a team and will continue to experience it.

Read through the blog post from 2011 and you will see that we haven’t changed much, but will continue boldly serving the Lord, even in persecution!

August 07, 2011 – Urgent Prayer Request
August 07, 2011 – What Happened on Sunday Morning
August 09, 2011 – Thoughts from What Happened Sunday
August 10, 2011 – The Questioning, Things to Note
August 12, 2011 – Church Situation – Quick Update
August 13, 2011 – A text from the Police Officer
August 14, 2011 – Great Service this Morning!
August 15, 2011 – What’s Next?
August 16, 2011 – Serving in Persecution
August 17, 2011 – 4 Red Flags
August 19, 2011 – The 007 Perception vs. Reality

Boldness Fail

I had a boldness fail the other day. I almost let fear win when someone was inquiring about the church.

I went to the Christian bookstore and bought 160 bibles and 10 audio bibles (I would have bought more bibles but that is all they had in stock at the moment). As I was checking out, the woman asked me about the bibles, why I was buying so many. I told her that we have a church and ask her if she was a Christian. She said she was a Christian and goes to a church.

We made our way to the elevator (she was helping me carry a couple of bags as I used the dolly to move the boxes of Bibles). As we waited for the elevator, she asked me about coming and visiting the church and she wanted the church phone number (which is my number). Then the thoughts came… people say that if you buy bibles in China, they will take your information and follow you. I entertained those thoughts as she stood there and waited for me to give her my phone number. I quickly gave her a number that had one number wrong, gave her the church website and told her the service times. I told her I didn’t have any business cards (that we just printed) and I didn’t, but I did have a flyer about the church and english corner that I could have gave her…and didn’t.

In that moment of entertaining the wrong thoughts I had a boldness fail. Proverbs says “The wicked flee when no man pursueth: But the righteous are bold as a lion.” I wasn’t acting like who I am.

As we stood there waiting, I thought to myself, “How can I expect God to do anything great in China if I am to afraid to give this woman the right phone number?” I realized I had no idea what her intentions were and I shouldn’t be the judge of that but leave it in the hands of a sovereign God.

I quickly corrected my actions and gave her the right number and told her to call when she wanted to come.

That was on a Wednesday. On Thursday, I got a text from her saying that her and a friend wanted to come and visit the church. I sent them the address. I left the situation in God’s hands and continued like we normally do.

About 20 min before the start of the service, her and a guy friend showed up. They came in the church and we started talking. It seemed as if they were genuine Christians and just genuinely interested in coming to see the church. They already attend another house church in the city but offered to help us in any way that we needed. That Thursday was one of our best services and largest attended service since we started the church.

The man who came with the woman even offered to help with the audio bibles we bought.

It was a blessing… that I almost missed… because of fear.

Maybe the cops will show up tomorrow or maybe these two people are really good undercover agents, but I will just leave that in the hands of my Sovereign God.

Boldness: Two Reactions

Think about the following scenarios:

(A) You are a missionary to China. Are you excited and eager to get the gospel to as many people as possible. You pass out tracts openly. You try to talk with people about the gospel as much as possible and are earnestly trying to get the gospel out. One day, you give a tract to the wrong person and the next thing that you know, you are surrounded by police.

(B) You are a missionary to China. You are excited about getting the gospel to as many people as possible. You start a church and the gospel is being preach every week. One day the police show up and stop the service.

In both scenarios God does the miraculous. You don’t get kicked out of the country. You praise God for allowing you to stay and continue the work of the ministry.

Think about the two responses to the above scenarios:

(1) I was bold and got caught so I need I be careful. 
One can easily reason with themselves that they were being too bold and the line was drawn. Even though God delivered them from being kicked out of the country, there is a new cautiousness based on being caught instead of a new boldness based on God’s deliverance.

(2) I was bold and got caught but God delivered me, therefore, I have faith to be even bolder and trust God for another miracle.
 This one is harder to reckon to be true, but I think it is the right reaction to have. We see God work in our lives and we should trust him to do more. We need to see that He did it once and can do it again. It should build our faith to do even more than what we were doing before!

Serpents and Doves (5 of 5) Why?

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Why? Why is it so important that we be as wise as serpents and harmless as doves in the midst of a hostile environment?

I think this is the biggest misconception.

Answer: So in the midst of persecution we will proclaim, glorify and fulfill God’s purposes!

Being wise like the serpent, you are aware and judging the situation, you know when it is time to go or stay. You are always proclaiming the message, even if it is actually the Spirit speaking through you (Matthew 10:18-20).

Being harmless like a dove, you are willing to enter the most hostile environments without being hostile. Your suffering is a testimony to the grace of God.

This simple command is a call for us to act properly in the face of persecution. I will end with this quote:

“We see that Christ condemns that carnal wisdom, or rather that trickery, in which the greater part of men are too fond of indulging, while they look around them on every hand to discover how far it will be safe for them to proceed; and thus, from an unwillingness to encounter danger, they renounce the call of Christ.” [1]

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Serpents and Doves (4 of 5) Harmlessness

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“Doves, on the other hand, though naturally timid, and liable to innumerable attacks, fly in their simplicity, imagine themselves safe till they are struck, and in most cases place themselves within the reach of the fowler’s snares. To such simplicity Christ exhorts his disciples, that no excess of terror may hinder them from pursuing their course.” [1]

A dove is harmless. From what I understand, they have no real defense. A dove is not going to fight back. It isn’t seeking to hurt others. It isn’t trying to take advantage of others. It isn’t attacking others.

A dove doesn’t have much of an offense or a defense. I dove gets taken advantage of. A dove easily puts it self in danger that is seems silly or stupid.

A dove is vulnerable. It isn’t fearful. It doesn’t go into hiding.

As a messenger of the gospel, “harm”, should not be characteristic of who we are. Though people will mock, hate and hurt us because of the gospel, we shouldn’t fight back. To apply this to our lives we have to understand that God uses suffering for the advancement of the gospel!

May we be harmless.

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